We Mean Business – Nonprofit Employees with a Business Degree

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Written by Miles Bilka
Reading Time: 1 minutes 30 secs

Since I was a kid, I knew I wanted to have an impactful career surrounded by helping others – however that would look. I first began my studies toward becoming a physical therapist, healing others physically. Next, I adjusted my plans to pursue interests in social work and public administration, supporting my community. In the end, my interests in social enterprises and the nonprofit sector drew me to a bachelor’s in business administration. Unlike what you might think, my business degree has aided my career in the nonprofit sector tremendously.

Like many of my fellow undergraduate students, I started my career off with an internship. Within this internship, I was able to see the abundance of opportunities students like me have within the nonprofit sector. With the nonprofit industry being the third-largest employer in the U.S., the social sector makes it a great option for business majors choosing a career post-graduation. Although these organizations’ main goal is their social mission, rather than generating a profit, that does not make them immune to utilizing business fundamentals. The standard course load found in a business school such as management, finance, marketing, human resources, and entrepreneurship are easily transferable to any nonprofit organization. Just like for-profit organizations, nonprofit organizations require marketers, designers, content creators, accountants, human resource directors, project managers, social media coordinators, and so much more. According to The 2020 Nonprofit Employment Report, the number of jobs created by nonprofit organizations grew by 18.6%, three times faster than for-profit businesses in the exact same period. Many business majors who decide to work in the voluntary sector find their careers to be much more meaningful. These professionals find their jobs to be more fulfilling because they are passionate about the impact they are making. Don’t let the “nonprofit” fool you, we mean business.