Category Archives: Implicit Bias

All That We Share

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We live in a time where we quickly put people in boxes. Maybe we have more in common than what we think?


The Ladder of Inference Creates Bad Judgement

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Award-winning author Ed Muzio describes Chris Argyris’ “Ladder of Inference” model and how you can use it to avoid making incorrect judgments. The Ladder of Inference causes us to move from data within our perception to beliefs and actions based upon our assumptions. Avoiding these jumps improves workplace communication and increases the likelihood of productive coworker relationships.


Implicit Bias and Its Role in Philanthropy and Grantmaking

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Philanthropy has proven itself a powerful mechanism for working toward a more equitable society by challenging oppression and seeking to ensure social, economic and political change. This article will focus on the processes of the mind. Even when people explicitly and consciously support fairness, nonconscious processes can undermine their intentions through implicit bias.


Microagressions in Everyday Life

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Bestselling author Derald Wing Sue explains what a microaggression is, how it manifests itself, how it impacts people, and what can be done to address it. He shares information on some of the harmful impacts that microaggressions have on marginalized groups in our society.


Buffalo, Awkward Moment

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Tiltfactor designs games that use psychological principles to promote learning, attitude change, and behavior change. Tiltfactor investigates the power of story, systems thinking, and empathy to craft powerful experiences that make a difference in people’s lives: by reducing stereotypes and biases, promoting wellness, harnessing new forms of knowledge, and increasing global awareness. Try playing Akward Moment, which gives players a hand of Reactions and together they face hysterical, embarrassing, or stressful events.


6 Ways to Overcome Your Biases for Good

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Implicit bias refers to sneakier attitudes or stereotypes that we hold but are not generally aware of. Your explicit belief might be that everyone is equal, but you may find yourself reacting inconsistently. This article provides 6 tips for bringing your implicit attitudes more in line with your explicit ones.


Implicit Bias

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The Implicit Association Test (IAT) measures attitudes and beliefs that people may be unwilling or unable to report and the strength of associations between concepts (e.g., black people, gay people) and evaluations (e.g., good, bad) or stereotypes (e.g., athletic, clumsy). The main idea is that making a response is easier when closely related items share the same response key. Log in, register, or sign in as a guest to find out your implicit associations about race, gender, sexual orientation, and other topics.